Technology treatment

What We're Clicking On – August 29th, 2018

In our weekly news filter ‘What We’re Clicking On’, we share our thoughts on the most interesting articles relating to the future of cities, buildings and interiors.

The New York Times is paying attention to dementia treatments pioneered by doctors and caregivers across the Netherlands. These healthcare workers are harnessing the power of relaxation, childhood memories, sensory aids, soothing music and other tools to heal the residents rather than relying on the typical prescription of bed rest, medication and, in some cases, physical restraints. In this interesting piece, Katja Ebben, intensive care manager at the home Vitalis Peppelrode in Eindhoven, explains that she has noticed that with the newer techniques patients need less medication and fewer physical restraints.

Check out the examples and companies involved in Dutch dementia treatment on nytimes.com

Speaking of tech and dementia Three Square Market – a tech company famous for microchipping willing employees – announced the debut of a microchip powered by body heat with GPS technology and voice recognition. According to the company, the one of the key applications of the technology is for patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Read more on this development on cnbc.com

This week, we stumbled upon a piece by the Washington Post on the IncenTrip app. This app, developed by the University of Maryland, makes commuting easier, faster and cheaper by encouraging commuters to make smart choices — and by rewarding them when they do. The app uses real-time data to predict travel times on multiple modes of transportation, offering commuters options for getting where they want to go. Over time, IncenTrip also will use artificial intelligence to analyze users’ travel habits and identify strategies to help improve their commutes. And by offering users points that can be redeemed for prizes it turns the daily commute into a fun and engaging activity.

Want to know more? Read this whole article on washingtonpost.com

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